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Susan D. Shaw, DrPH

Environmental Health Scientist

President/Founder, Marine Environmental Research Institute, Blue Hill, ME
Professor, School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York, Albany, NY

Dr. Susan Shaw

Susan D. Shaw is an environmental health scientist, explorer, ocean conservationist, and author. A Doctor of Public Health, she is a professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the School of Public Health at the State University of New York at Albany, and the founder of the Marine Environmental Research Institute. Shaw has worked extensively on issues related to toxic chemical exposure and its impacts on human health and wildlife.

A Fulbright Scholar with dual degrees from Columbia University in film and public health/ environmental health sciences, Shaw published Overexposure, the first book on the health hazards of photographic chemicals, in 1983 with landscape photographer Ansel Adams. Shaw is credited as the first scientist to show that brominated flame retardant chemicals used in consumer products have contaminated marine mammals and commercially important fish stocks in the northwest Atlantic Ocean. An outspoken voice on ocean pollution, Shaw is known for diving into the Gulf of Mexico oil slick following the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion and informing the national debate on the controversial use of chemical dispersants in offshore oil spills. Her research has influenced policy decisions on the management of toxic chemicals in the US and abroad.

The recipient of numerous awards, Dr. Shaw is a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Scholar and was named Gulf of Maine Visionary by the Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment. In 2011, she received the Society of Women Geographers’ Gold Medal Award, joining the ranks of Amelia Earhart, Margaret Mead, Jane Goodall, and Sylvia Earle. She is the 19th woman to receive the society’s highest award in 78 years. In 2012, Dr. Shaw received the Explorers Club Citation of Merit Award for “extraordinary feats of exploration and research” and her leadership role in ocean conservation.

Education

 

1999    

Dr.P.H. Columbia University, School of Public Health, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, New York, NY
Doctoral thesis: Shaw, S.D. (1998). Organochlorines and Biomarkers of Immune and Endocrine Effects in Pacific Harbor Seal and Northern Elephant Seal Pups (359 pp)

1981

M.P.H. Columbia University School of Public Health, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, New York, NY

1973

M.F.A. Columbia University School of Fine Arts/Film Division, New York, NY

Experience: 1990 to Present

 

2011-   

Professor, Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, State University of New York, Albany, NY

2011-   

Faculty and Charter Advisory Board Member, The Corning School of Ocean Studies, Maine Maritime Academy, Ocean Studies Advisory Board, Castine, Maine

1990-   

President/Founder, Senior Scientist, Marine Environmental Research Institute, Center for Marine Studies, Blue Hill, ME

Primary Research Interests

 

Public Health, Environmental Chemistry, Ecotoxicology:

Biomonitoring; chemical exposure assessment in humans and wildlife

Exposure and health effects of toxic, carcinogenic chemicals and combustion by-product chemicals in highly exposed human populations (fire fighters, e waste workers)

Indoor pollution: toxic halogenated and non-halogenated contaminants in consumer and household products

Food contamination, human exposure and human health risk assessment

Wildlife exposures, food chain transfer, bioaccumulation, biomagnification, endocrine disruption and other exposure-related effects in sentinel species

Mechanisms of toxicity of pollutants in complex environmental mixtures, toxicity identification and evaluation

Current Work

 

Shaw is currently investigating the impacts of toxic chemical exposure in highly exposed human populations, including firefighters. She was the lead scientist on a recent pilot study of California fire fighters that revealed new information about their exposure to carcinogenic chemicals while fire fighting (Shaw et al. Chemosphere 2013; The Hill Blog 2013; Bangor Daily News 2013). Tragically, fire fighters have elevated rates of many types of cancer. When flame retardant-treated furniture and plastics burn, large amounts of carcinogens such as dioxins and furans are released into smoke and soot that fire fighters cannot avoid inhaling, ingesting, and absorbing through their skin. The California study showed that individual fire fighters can accumulate extremely high levels of flame retardant chemicals and their carcinogenic by-products that place them at risk for cancers.

Based on the findings of the California study, Dr. Shaw and her colleagues at SUNY Albany are initiating long-term research on toxic exposure and health outcomes in fire fighters in the US Northeast region. The studies represent the first comprehensive exposure assessment in fire fighters and will be conducted at the Wadsworth Laboratory, State University of New York-Albany, which is ranked among the four top environmental chemistry labs in the country. This longitudinal research will begin in 2014 and will analyze a wide range of toxic, carcinogenic chemicals in firefighters as well as biomarkers of health conditions including pre-cancer and cancer markers.

Sentinel Species Research, Northwest Atlantic: 2000 - 2013

 

Shaw founded the Marine Environmental Research Institute in 1990 and established the Center for Marine Studies on the Maine coast in 2000 to expand the Institute’s research and operations in the northwest Atlantic. That year, she began the Institute’s long-term investigation utilizing marine sentinel species to characterize chemical contamination in the northwest Atlantic marine ecosystem (from Maine to New York). As top predators, marine mammals are important sentinels because they accumulate high levels of toxic chemicals through the food chain over a long lifetime. 

Funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this region-wide investigation has produced a unique, large body of data on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in marine mammals and fish and placed the region in a global perspective. The research shows that the body burdens of toxic chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and the flame retardants polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in northwest Atlantic harbor seals are among the highest in the world. The State of Maine 123rd Legislature recognized this body of work with a Citation of Recognition in 2007 and Shaw was named Gulf of Maine Visionary by the Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment representing the New England states and Atlantic Canada.

In 2009, Shaw co-authored the first major review of brominated flame retardants in marine ecosystems of the American continents (Shaw and Kannan, Reviews on Environmental Health 2009). In 2010, Shaw was the lead author on a pivotal review paper on halogenated flame retardants that had national policy implications (Shaw et al. Reviews on Environmental Health 2010). Co-authored by Dr. Linda Birnbaum, the current director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the paper challenged the efficacy of these chemicals in preventing fire deaths and presented substantial scientific evidence of the harmful health effects, including cancers, of exposure to halogenated flame retardants in consumer products. This review was the basis for the San Antonio Statement (DiGangi et al. Environ Health Persp 2011) signed by more than 300 scientists from 30 countries which cited the need for global regulatory action on these chemicals.

“Seals As Sentinels” research has resulted in a series of break-through discoveries that are influencing public policies on toxic chemicals: 

First report of the occurrence of PBDEs, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and HBCDs, hexabromocyclododecanes, brominated flame retardant chemicals used in consumer products in tissues of harbor seals and commercially important marine fishes along the northwest Atlantic. First study to demonstrate that PBDEs readily bioaccumulate and biomagnify in top marine predators and the northwest Atlantic marine ecosystem is contaminated by all three PBDE commercial formulations (Shaw et al. Science of the Total Environment 2009, 2012). This information helped drive toxics policy decisions in Maine and nation-wide. Penta- and OctaBDE were phased out of use by most countries in 2004-2005. The third product, DecaBDE was banned by states in 2007 and scheduled for a nationwide phase-out in 2013.

First study to show that PFCs, perfluorinated chemicals used in stain-resistant fabrics, fast food wrappers, and nonstick cookware are accumulating in tissues of harbor seals from the northwest Atlantic. Two carcinogenic PFCs, PFOS and PFOA, were phased out in 2002. The current PFC pattern in seal tissues suggests that new PFCs have replaced the ones that were phased out (Shaw et al. Chemosphere 2008). 

First study to show that harbor seals from the northwest Atlantic carry high levels of brominated flame retardants (PBDEs) in their tissues (Shaw et al. Chemosphere 2008). The findings supported the Maine state legislature’s decision to ban the neurotoxic flame retardant DecaBDE in 2007.

First report of cancer-causing chemicals (PCBs, dioxins, PBDEs) in farmed Atlantic salmon from Maine and eastern Canada that detract from the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids. The study contradicts the current paradigm by demonstrating that removal of skin does not consistently lower contaminant levels in farmed salmon and calls for responsible labeling and a reassessment of health risks associated with human dietary exposure (Shaw et al. Environ.Sci.Tech. 2006; Shaw et al. Chemosphere 2008).

First study to document elevated levels of legacy (banned) organochlorine chemicals such as PCBs and DDT in tissues of harbor seals along the northwest Atlantic. Their levels are extremely high and comparable to those in seals from the Baltic and other polluted seas, and place them at risk for harmful effects such as immune and thyroid disruption, developmental problems, and infectious disease (Shaw et al. Marine Pollution Bulletin 2005).

Shaw’s latest study (Shaw et al. 2013, in press) has detected untested replacement flame retardant chemicals such as Firemaster 550 in tissues of seal pups. The study reveals that replacements for banned flame retardants used in foam furniture and plastics are widespread contaminants in the ocean and raises concern about the health of seal pups who are exposed to large amounts of the chemicals in utero and via mother’s milk and are more vulnerable to toxic effects than adults.

Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill 2010 - 2013

 

In May 2010, a month after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, Shaw went to the Gulf to investigate the impact of the chemical dispersant Corexit used to contain the oil spill. She was the first marine scientist to dive into the oil slick (Swimming Through the Spill, New York Times May 2010) without hazmat gear and realized that the dispersant-oil mixture was more toxic to wildlife and people than the oil alone because of the increased exposure to hydrocarbons and the synergistic toxicity of Corexit and oil components.

She was appointed to the Department of the Interior’s Strategic Sciences Working Group charged with assessing the consequences of the oil spill. As the public health/ toxicology expert on the team, Shaw informed the national debate on the controversial application of Corexit in the Gulf.  She delivered a memo in September 2010 to federal agencies stating there is no safe level of exposure to cancer-causing compounds in oil, and warned that Corexit dispersants, in combination with crude oil, would result in a legacy of long-term damage to wildlife and human health in the Gulf region.

Shaw subsequently launched Gulf EcoTox, an independent, region-wide investigation into the effects of oil and chemical dispersants in the food web, and was one of the few scientists allowed to collect samples from heavily oiled areas during the high exposure period. The study is ongoing.

In the months after the oil spill, Shaw drafted a Consensus Statement signed by prominent ocean scientists opposing the unprecedented application of Corexit dispersants in the Gulf. She delivered two TEDx talks in Washington, DC and was featured in numerous national media outlets including CNN discussing the tragic health outcomes that would result from the decision to use Corexit dispersants to contain the spill. Shaw predicted the decimation of deep-water corals, species known to be sensitive to the Corexit-oil mixture, and the deaths of dolphins from inhalation of the mixture as they surfaced to breathe through the plumes of dispersed oil, both outcomes which occured. She also predicted long-term impacts on human health related to chronic exposure. She appeared in documentary films on the oil spill, including Animal Planet’s Black Tide: Voices of the Gulf and Green Planet’s The Big Fix, the Official Selection documentary at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival.

This fall, Dr. Shaw will deliver her third TEDx talk: If Truth Be Told: Secrets and Lies About the Gulf Oil Spill in Washington DC October 25-26 2013: (see TEDx MidAtlantic).

Service to Science & Community

 

Professor, Department of Environmental Health Services, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, NY

Faculty, Institute for Health and the Environment, SUNY at Albany, NY

US Department of Interior Strategic Sciences Working Group (SSWG), a team of 14 scientists charged with assessing health consequences of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill and recommending policy actions to federal agencies

International Panel on Chemical Pollution, a select group of scientists advising policymakers on the management of toxic chemicals in developed and developing countries

Member of Editorial Boards: 
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, Elsevier Ltd., London. www.elsevier.com/ees
Reviews on Environmental Health, Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG, Berlin/New York

Ocean Studies Advisory Board, Cornell School of Ocean Studies, Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME

Special Session Chair (since 2003), International Dioxin Symposia on Halogenated Persistent Organic Pollutants held in Tokyo, Japan, Oslo, Norway, Berlin, Germany, Toronto, Canada, Birmingham, UK, Venice, Italy, Gyeongju, Korea, Beijing, China, San Antonio, TX, and Brussels, Belgium.

Session Chair 2010, Marine and Coastal Pollution, Asia Pacific Meeting, Society of Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), Guangzhou, China

Session Chair 2008 (4 sessions), Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals, Cape Town, South Africa

Chair, The Explorers Club State of the Oceans Forums highlighting solutions to the crisis facing the world’s oceans.

Ecosystem Indicator Partnership (ESIP) and Gulfwatch Contaminants Monitoring Committee, Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment

Delegate,United Nations Economic and Social Council on Ocean Pollution, Sustainable Ocean Development, and Marine Affairs, New York, Geneva, and Vienna

Delegate, Advisory Committee on Pollution of the Sea (ACOPS), London, UK

Honors/Awards

 

Explorers Club Citation of Merit Award for extraordinary accomplishments in research and leadership in ocean conservation

Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow

TEDx Speaker 2010 - 2013 Celebrating the Power of Ideas to Change the World

Smart Planet, “25 Amazing People We Talked To in 2012”, Susan Shaw, Marine Toxicologist at www.smartplanet.com/blog/pure-genius/q-a-susan-shaw-marine-toxicologist

Mainebiz Magazine Next Award 2012 for innovative research and thought leadership that is shaping the future of Maine and its economy

Gold Medal Award 2011, Society of Women Geographers. First awarded to Amelia Earhart in 1933, this highest honor of the Society has been given to 19 women over 78 years.

Audubon Society Women in Conservation, “Woman of the Gulf” 2011, Rachel Carson Awards, New York City

MORE Magazine’s 2010 “Noisemaker” Award for work in the Gulf of Mexico

Fellow, The Explorers Club Fellow, New York City

Fellow, WINGS World Quest, dedicated to recognizing and supporting visionary women who are advancing scientific inquiry and environmental conservation, New York City

Gulf of Maine Visionary Award, Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment representing New England states and Atlantic Canada.

Citation of Recognition Award, State of Maine 123rd Legislature and the people of the State of Maine. Governor’s award for advancing knowledge of chemical contamination of the marine environment and the health effects of toxic chemicals in marine mammals and humans.

Plan II Honors, University of Texas, an interdisciplinary honors program modeled after the Harvard Society of Fellows Program

UT-Chilean Exchange Program 1964

Fulbright Scholar 1964-65, Santiago, Chile

Lectures and Keynote Addresses

 

Dr. Shaw is a keynote speaker on the impacts of toxic chemical exposure on wildlife and human health at major venues in North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa including: Stockholm University; Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm; Northeastern University; University of California, Berkeley; TEDx MidAtlantic; The Explorers Club, New York City; Western Academy of Beijing, China; Ehime University, Matsuyama, Japan. 

Recent Lectures (2010 – 2013)

2013    Presentation/media interview, Orrington Fire Department, Maine Scientist to Study Link Betwewen Fire Fighters and Cancer, 4 December, Orrington, Maine

2013    Plenary lecture, Wilderness Medical Society Conference, Bitter Medicine: The Legacy of Corexit in the Gulf, 2 November, Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Dauphin Island, AL.

2013    Featured Lecture, TEDxMidAtlantic Conference, Reckless Endangerment: The Gulf Oil Spill Revisited, 26 October, Washington, DC 

2013    Presentation, Meeting with Representative Michael Michaud, Representative Chellie Pingree, Investigation of Chemical Exposures and Health Outcomes in Maine Fire Fighters, 24 October, Washington DC

2013    Presentation, Meeting with Senator Angus King, Senator Susan Collins, Investigation of Chemical Exposures and Health Outcomes in Maine Fire Fighters, 23 October, Washington DC

2013    Plenary lecture, Maine Fire Chief’s Association Annual Meeting, Augusta Civic Center, Chemical Exposure and Health Outcomes in Fire Fighters, 3 October, Augusta, Maine

2013    Keynote presentation, Hancock County Fire Chiefs Meeting, Toxic Exposure and Fire Fighter Health, 17 September, Seal Harbor, Maine

2013    Plenary lecture, St. Brendan The Navigator, In The Footsteps of Rachel Carson: Can Our Oceans Survive, 4 September, Deer Isle, Maine

2013    Elisabeth Mann Borgese Distinguished Lecture, Marine Environmental Research Institute, Firefighters, Flame Retardants, and Cancer: A Burning Issue, 26 July, Blue Hill, Maine

2013    Plenary lecture, Stockholm University and The Swedish Museum of Natural History, When Flame Retardants Burn: Exposure and Health Risks to Firefighters, 14 June, Stockholm, Sweden

2013    Seminar, Uppsala University, Faculty of Science & Technology, Flame Retardants and Health Risks in Sentinel Species: From Marine Mammals to Firefighters, 12 June, Uppsala, Sweden

2013    Plenary lecture, Ph.D. Examination, Uppsala University, Faculty of Science & Technology, Ecotoxicology: An Overview, 11 June, Uppsala, Sweden

2013    Featured lecture, Green Science Policy Institute Symposium, Flame Retardants and Health Risks in Sentinel Species: From Marine Mammals to Firefighters, 12 April, San Francisco, CA

2012    Woodrow Wilson lecture, Northeastern University, International Conflict/ International Law, Diving In:A Marine Scientist Takes on Pollution, Policy and Public Health, 29 March, Boston, MA

2012    Woodrow Wilson lecture, Northeastern University, Marine Sciences Center, Ocean Pollution In An Ecological Perspective: Impacts of Emerging Contaminants on Marine Wildlife, 29 March, Nahant, MA

2012    Woodrow Wilson lecture, Northeastern University, Food & American Society, Taking the Skin Off: The Truth About Chemical Contaminants in Farmed Salmon, 28 March, Boston, MA

2012    Woodrow Wilson lecture, Northeastern University, Meet The Author Library Series, The Gulf Of Mexico Oil Spill Inside Out, 28 March, Boston, MA

2011    Keynote lecture, Visions of the Sea, Swedish Marine Sciences Conference. Ocean Pollution in an Ecological Perspective: Impacts Of Emerging Contaminants On Marine Wildlife, 22 November, Stockholm, Sweden

2011    Featured lecture, 31st International Symposium on Halogenated Environmental Organic Pollutants and Persistent Organic Pollutants, Halogenated Flame Retardants: Do the Fire Safety Benefits Justify the Risks? In: Risk Assessment, Management, and Regulation Session, 21-26 August, Brussels, Belgium

2011    Keynote lecture, Society of Women Geographers’ Triennial: Local and Global Sustainability, Diving In: A Marine Scientist Takes on Pollution, Policy, and Public Health, 21 May, Boulder, CO

2011    Keynote lecture, Gulf Coast Leadership Summit, Aftermath of the Gulf Oil Spill: A Marine Toxicologist’s Perspective, 20 April, New Orleans, LA

2010    Plenary lecture, American College of Toxicology, 31st Annual Meeting, The Imperiled Gulf of Mexico: A Marine Toxicologist’s Perspective, 10 November, Baltimore, MD

2010    TEDx Talk: The Gulf of Mexico Inside Out: Strategic Science of the Oil Spill, TEDx MidAtlantic,5 November, Washington, DC

2010    Plenary lecture, Casco Bay Estuary Partnership, State of the Bay 2010, Emerging Contaminants in the Gulf of Maine, 21 October, Portland, ME

2010    Plenary lecture, Green Science Policy Institute Symposium, Chemicals and the Gulf Oil Spill: Science and Policy, 12 September, San Antonio, TX

2010    TEDx Talk: Imperiled Gulf: A Marine Toxicologist’s Perspective, TEDx Oil Spill, 28 June, Washington, DC

Selected Publications

Op-Editorials

Shaw, S.D. (2013). A burning issue for firefighters: Flame retardants and cancer. The Hill’s Congress Blog 3/06/13.

Shaw, S.D. (2013). Op-Editorial: Searsport LPG terminal would threaten human health and the environment. Bangor Daily News, March 22.

Shaw, S.D. (2011). Op-Editorial: The cure for the Gulf oil spill is as bad as the sickness. The Times, London, UK, April 20.

Shaw, S.D. (2010). Op-Editorial: Swimming Through the Spill. The New York Times, Sunday Opinion, New York, NY, May 30.

Shaw, S.D. (1991). Op-Editorial: Marine life under siege. Dallas Times Herald, September 24.

Research Articles, Reports

Shaw, S.D., Harris, J.H., Berger, M.L., Subedi, B., and Kannan, K. (2014, in press). Brominated Flame Retardants and Their Replacements in Food Packaging and Household Products – Uses, Human Exposure and Health Effects. In: Snedeker, S.M. (Ed), Toxicants in Plastics and Paper: Exposure and Health Risks to Consumers from Household Products and Food Packaging. New York/Heidelberg: Springer.

Shaw, S.D., Berger, M.L., Harris, J.H., Subedi, B., and Kannan, K. (2014). Reviw article: Novel and Replacement Flame Retardants in Household Products and Food Packaging. For Environment International (in preparation).

Shaw, S.D., Berger, M.L., Harris, J.H., Yun, S.H., Wu, Q., Liao, C., Blum, A., Stefani, A., and Kannan, K. (2013). Persistent organic pollutants including polychlorinated and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in firefighters from northern California. Chemosphere 91:1386-1394.

Shaw, S.D. (2012). The Risk of Vostok: Time Capsule or Tipping Point? The Explorers Journal 90 (1): 11-13.

Shaw, S.D., Berger, M.L., Weijs, L., Covaci, A. (2012). Tissue-specific accumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) including Deca-BDE and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in harbor seals from the northwest Atlantic. Environment International 44:1-6.

Shaw, S. D., Berger, M.L., and Kannan, K. (2011). Status and trends of POPs in harbor seals from the northwest Atlantic. In: Loganathan, B.G. and Lam, P.K.S. (Eds.) Global Contamination Trends of Persistent Organic Chemicals. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, pp. 515-546.

Guo, Y., Shaw, S. D., and Kannan, K. (2011). Spatial and temporal trends of polybrominated diphenyl ethers. In: Loganathan, B.G. and Lam, P.K.S. (Eds.) Global Contamination Trends of Persistent Organic Chemicals. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, pp. 33-71.

Shaw, S. D. and Kannan, K. (2011). Ocean pollution: Health and environmental impacts of brominated flame retardants. In: Selendy, J.M.H. (Ed.) Water and Sanitation-Related Diseases and the Environment: Challenges, Interventions, and Preventive Measures. Hoboken, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., pp. 439-459.

Shaw, S. D., Blum, A., Weber, R., Kannan, K., Rich, D., Lucas, D., Koshland, C.P., Dobraca, D., Hanson, S., and Birnbaum, L. (2010). Halogenated flame retardants: Do the fire safety benefits justify the risks? Reviews on Environmental Health 25(4): 261-305.

DiGangi, J., Blum, A., Bergman  A., De Wit, C., Lucas, D., Mortimer, D. Schecter, A., Scheringer, M., Shaw, S.D., and Webster, T. (2010). San Antonio statement on brominated and chlorinated flame retardants. Environmental Health Perspectives 118(12): A516-A518.

Shaw, S.D. (2010). Imperiled seas: A report from the front lines. The Explorers Journal 88:12-13.

Shaw, S.D. (2010). Swimming through the spill. Op-Editorial. New York Sunday Times, New York, NY, May 30.

Shaw, S.D. and Kannan, K. (2009). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in marine ecosystems of the American continents: Foresight from current knowledge. Reviews on Environmental Health 24 (3):157-229.

Shaw, S. D., Berger, M. L., Brenner, D., Kannan, K., Lohmann, N., Päpke, O. (2009). Bioaccumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hexabromocyclododecane in the northwest Atlantic marine food web. Science of the Total Environment 407:3323-3329.

Shaw, S. D., Berger, M. L., Brenner, D., Tao, L., Wu, Q., Kannan, K. (2009). Specific accumulation of perfluorochemicals in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor) from the northwest Atlantic. Chemosphere 74: 1037–1043.

Shaw, S.D., Covaci, A., Weijs, L., Roosens, L., Berger. M.L., Neels, H., Blust, R.(2009). Accumulation of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and their metabolites in pup and adult harbour seals from the northwest Atlantic. Organohalogen Compounds 71: 1486-1490.

Shaw, S.D. (2008). Life on the ledge: An uncertain future for harbor seals. The Explorers Journal 86(1):18-23.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Berger, M.L., Fang, F., Hong, C-S., Addink, R., and Hilker, D. (2008). Bioaccumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in harbor seals from the northwest Atlantic. Chemosphere 73(11): 1773–1780.

Shaw, S.D., Berger, M.L., Brenner, D., Lohmann, N., and Päpke, O. (2008). Bioaccumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hexabromocyclododecane in the northwest Atlantic marine food web. Organohalogen Compounds 70: 841-845.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Berger, M.L., Fang, F., Hong, C-S., Storm, R., Hilker, D.,and O'Keefe, P. (2007). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in harbor seals from the northwestern Atlantic. Are seals debrominating DecaBDE? Organohalogen Compounds        69:829-832.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Berger, M.L., Dwyer, M., Fang, F., Hong, C-S., Storm, R., and O'Keefe, P. (2007). Patterns and trends of PCBs and PCDD/Fs in northwestern Atlantic harbor seals: Revisiting threshold levels using the new TEFs. Organohalogen Compounds 69:1752-1756.

Shaw, S.D., Berger, M.L., Brenner, D., Kannan, K., Lohmann, N., and Päpke, O. (2008). Bioaccumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hexabromocyclododecane in the northwest Atlantic marine food web. Organohalogen Compounds 70: 841-845.

Shaw, S.D. (2007). How are seals, as top predators, impacted by toxic contaminants in Casco Bay and the Gulf of Maine? In: Casco Bay Estuary Partnership Toxic Pollution in Casco Bay: Sources and Impacts, pp. 61-68.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Berger, M.L., Dwyer, M., Fang, F., Hong, C-S., Storm, R., and O’Keefe, P. (2007). Patterns and trends of PCBs and PCDD/Fs in NW Atlantic harbor seals: Revisiting toxic threshold levels using the new TEFs. Organohalogen Compounds 69: 1752-1756.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Berger, M.L., Fang, F., Hong, C-S., Storm, R., Hilker, D., and O’Keefe, P. (2007). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in harbor seals from the northwestern Atlantic: are seals debrominating Deca BDE? Organohalogen Compounds 69: 829-832.

Shaw, S.D. (2006). Seals as Sentinels: Assessing Toxic Contaminants in Northwestern Atlantic Coast Seals. Final Project Report to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. Marine Environmental Research Institute, Blue Hill, ME, 111 pp. Contract No. EA133F05CN1358.

Shaw, S.D., Berger, M.L., Brenner, D., Chu, M.D., Matherly, C.K, Chu, A.C., and Clark, G.C. (2006). Application of the CALUX bioassay for the determination of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs in tissues of harbor seals. Organohalogen Compounds 68:587-591.

Shaw, S.D., Berger, M.L., Brenner, D., Fang, F., Hong, C-S., Storm, R., and O'Keefe, P. (2006). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor) from the northwestern Atlantic. Organohalogen Compounds 68: 600-603.

Shaw, S.D., Berger, M.L., Brenner, D., and Kannan, K. (2006). Perfluorooctane sulfonate and related perfluorinated hydrocarbons in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor) from the northwest Atlantic. Organohalogen Compounds 68: 2042-2046.

Shaw, S.D. and Jenssen, B.M. (2006). Dioxin 2006 Session Summary: Levels and Effects in Marine Mammals. In: Thomsen, C. and Becher, G. (Eds), Plenary Lecture Abstracts and Session Summaries, 26th International Symposium on Halogenated Persistent Organic Pollutants, Oslo, Norway, pp. 51-54.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Berger, M.L., Carpenter, D.O., Hong, C-S, and Kannan, K. (2006). PCBs,PCDD/Fs, and organochlorine pesticides in farmed Atlantic salmon from Maine, eastern Canada, and Norway, and wild salmon from Alaska. Environmental Science &Technology 40:5347-5354.

Shaw, S.D. (2005). Seals as Sentinels: Assessing Toxic Contaminants in Northwestern Atlantic Coast Seals. Final Project Report to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. Marine Environmental Research Institute, Blue Hill, ME, 69 pp. Contract No. EA133F04CN0062.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Bourakovsky, A., Mahaffey, C.A., Perkins, C.R. (2005). Polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorinated pesticides in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor) from the northwestern Atlantic coastMarine Pollution Bulletin 50 (10):1069-1084.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Bourakovsky, A., Carpenter, D.O., Kannan, K., and Hong, C-S. (2005). PCBs, dioxin-like PCBs and organochlorine pesticides in farmed salmon (Salmo salar) from Maine and eastern Canada. Organohalogen Compounds 67: 1571-1576.

Shaw, S.D., Bourakovsky, A., Brenner, D., Carpenter, D.O., Tao, L. Kannan, K., and Hong, C-S. (2005). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in farmed salmon (Salmo salar) from Maine and eastern Canada. Organohalogen Compounds 67: 644-646.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Bourakovsky, A. Mahaffey, C.A., and Perkins, C.R. (2004). Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor) from the northwestern Atlantic coast. Organohalogen Compounds 66: 1581-1588.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Mahaffey, C.A., De Guise, S., Perkins, C.R., Clark, G.C., Denison, M.S., and Waring, G.T. (2003). Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and immune function in US Atlantic coast harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor). Organohalogen Compounds 62: 220-223.

Shaw, S.D. (2003). Gulf of Maine Forum 2002: Protecting our coastal and offshore waters, Summary Report. Marine Environmental Research Institute (MERI), Blue Hill, ME, 21 pp.

Shaw, S.D. and Lebeuf, M. (2003). Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in marine mammals. Organohalogen Compounds, Dioxin 2003 Summary, pp. 35-36.

Shaw, S.D. (2002). An Investigation of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and Heavy Metals in Tissues of Harbor Seals and Gray Seals in the Gulf of Maine. Final Report to the Maine Department of Environmental Protection: 17 pp.

Shaw, S.D. (2002). Persistent organic pollutants and mercury in Gulf of Maine seals. Gulf of Maine Forum Proceedings 2002: pp. 1-6.

Shaw, S.D. (2002). Seals as sentinels for the Gulf of Maine ecosystem. Gulf of Maine Forum Proceedings 2002: pp. 1-7.

Shaw, S.D. (2001). Perinatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants: parallels in seals and humans. Organohalogen Compounds 53: 21-26.

Shaw, S.D., De Guise, S., Barclay, J.S., Brock, J., Brouwer, A., Dewailly, E., Fair, P.A., Fournier, M., Grandjean, P., Guillette Jr.,L.J., Hahn, M.E., Koopman-Esseboom, C., Letcher, R.J., Matz, A., Norstrom, R.J., Perkins, C.R, Schwacke, L., Skaare, J.U., Sowles, J., St. Aubin, D.J., Stegeman, J., and Whaley, J.E. (2001). Atlantic Coast Contaminants Workshop 2000: Consensus Statement of 22 Wildlife and Human Health Experts. Environmental Health Perspectives 109(12): 1301-1302.

Shaw, S.D. (2000). Immune function and thyroid hormone levels in Pacific harbor seals following perinatal exposure to organochlorines: Comparisons in neonatal seals and humans. In: Shaw, S.D., and De Guise, S. (Eds.), Atlantic Coast Contaminants Workshop (ACCW 2000): Endocrine Disruptors in the Marine Environment: Impacts on Marine Wildlife and Human Health, Marine Environmental Research Institute, Blue Hill, ME, pp. 145-151.

Shaw, S.D. and De Guise, S. (Eds.). (2000). Endocrine Disruptors in the Marine Environment: Impact on Marine Wildlife and Human Health. Atlantic Coast Contaminants Workshop 2000, Scientific Report of the Marine Environmental Research Institute: 192 pp.

De Guise, S., Shaw, S.D., Barclay, J.S., Brock, J., Brouwer, A., Dewailly, E., Fair, P.A., Fournier, M., Grandjean, P., Guillette Jr.,L.J., Hahn, M.E., Koopman-Esseboom, C., Letcher, R.J., Matz, A., Norstrom, R.J., Perkins, C.R, Schwacke, L., Skaare, J.U., Sowles, J., St. Aubin, D.J., Stegeman, J., and Whaley, J.E. (2001). Atlantic Coast Contaminants Workshop 2000: Consensus Statement of 22 Wildlife and Human Health Experts. Environmental Health Perspectives 109(12): 1301-1302.

Shaw, S.D., Brenner, D., Hong, C-S., Bush, B., and Shopp, G.M. (1999). Low-level exposure to PCBs is associated with immune and endocrine disruption in neonatal harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from the California coast. Organohalogen Compounds 42: 11-14.

Shaw, S.D. (1998). Organochlorines and Biomarkers of Immune and Endocrine Effects in Pacific Harbor Seal and Northern Elephant Seal Pups (Doctoral Thesis). New York: Columbia University School of Public Health/ Division of Environmental Health Sciences, 359 pp.

Shaw, S.D. and Brenner, D. (1998). Low-level organochlorine exposure: Are neonatal seals at special risk? In: Ross, P.S., and De Guise, S. (Eds). Environmental contaminants and marine mammal health: Research applications. Canadian Technical Report of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 2255: pp. 8. 

Hong, C.S., Xiao, J., Bush, B.,and Shaw, S.D. (1998). Environmental occurrence and potential toxicity of planar, mono-, and di-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls in the biota. Chemosphere 36(7):1637-1651

Hong, C-S., Calambokidis, J., Bush, B., Steiger, G.H., and Shaw, S.D. (1996). Polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in harbor seal pups from the inland waters of Washington State. Environmental Science & Technology 30(3):837-844.

Media

Dr. Susan Shaw at TEDxMidAtlantic 2013

Dr. Susan Shaw at TEDxMidAtlantic 2010

Dr. Susan Shaw at TEDxOilSpill 2010

Dr. Susan Shaw in The Big Fix


Dr. Susan Shaw in Black Tide: Voices from the Gulf


Dr. Susan Shaw – “Oceans in Crisis”


Dr. Susan Shaw on CNN


Dr. Susan Shaw interview on 207 program – WCSH-6 NBC-TV


Study shows source of toxic, cancer-causing chemicals


How Healthy Are the Oceans? Interview on the Leonard Lopate Show


Living on Earth – Dispersant Discussion


Profiles and Interviews

Susan D. Shaw (Wikipedia)

25 amazing people we talked to in 2012

Is your jacket contributing to pollution? Blue Hill group studying microplastics' effect on the ocean

Tackling a Hidden Threat to Marine Mammals

Study shows source of toxic, cancer causing chemicals

Study: Exposure to flame retardant chemicals means firefighters face higher cancer risk than previously thought

Carson's contribution remembered

Susan Shaw fights pollutants to keep Maine's coast open for business

Dr. Susan Shaw: Marine Toxicologist – Jumps Deep Into The State of Our Oceans

Marine toxicologist Susan Shaw

Diving deep: Susan Shaw, ocean crusader and environmental health pioneer

Q&A: Susan Shaw, marine toxicologist

Judge Barbier dismisses claims against Corexit maker NALCO in BP case

Cleaning up oil spills with magnets and nanotechnology

Is The Gulf Getting Better? A Marine Toxicologist Weighs In

The risk of Vostok: Time capsule or tipping point?

Research institute launches microplastics monitoring

Dr. Susan Shaw To Address Threat of Rising Toxicity on World Oceans Day

Adventurous scientist to receive national honors

Dr. Susan Shaw to receive prestigious award

Marine scientist joins ranks of Amelia Earhart, Jane Goodall

Dr. Susan Shaw: working towards a better ocean without chemicals

Deep Water Horizon oil still affects Gulf Coast environment, residents

The cure for the Gulf oil spill is as bad as the sickness

Seal deaths rise to 128; scientist cites toxins

Susan Shaw Receives MORE Magazine's 2010 Noisemaker Award

Maine scientist part of the solution in gulf

TEDxOilSpill Speaker Susan Shaw Launches Independent Research Group to Study Effects of Oil and Dispersants in Gulf

Marine Toxicologist Susan Shaw Dives Into Gulf Spill, Talks Dispersants and Food Web Damage

BP's well is sealed, but the tragedy in the Gulf may be far from over

Toxic dispersants in Gulf oil spill creating hidden marine crisis

What the EPA Dispersant Tests Fail to Tell Us

Oil Spill Dispersants Shifting Ecosystem Impacts in Gulf, Scientists Warn

Spray, baby, spray: oil spill solutions part of the problem

Consensus Statement: Scientists oppose the use of dispersant chemicals in the Gulf of Mexico

What will be left after the oil spill?

Debate grows over impact of dispersed oil

For the Gulf, It's Death in the Ocean from Top to Bottom

 

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Reckless Endangerment: The Gulf Oil Spill Revisited

Dr. Susan Shaw at TEDxMidAtlantic 2013

Six Months After the Oil Spill,
Where Are We?

Dr. Susan Shaw at TEDxMidAtlantic 2010

Dr. Susan Shaw
Explorers Club Call to Action Video

In the Footsteps of Rachel Carson:
Can Our Oceans Survive?

Study shows source of toxic,
cancer-causing chemicals

 

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View Dr. Susan Shaw's Short Bio
View Dr. Susan Shaw's CV

 

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